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Today, solid majorities of adults across much of the region say they believe in God, and most identify with a religion.Orthodox Christianity and Roman Catholicism are the most prevalent religious affiliations, much as they were more than 100 years ago in the twilight years of the Russian and Austro-Hungarian empires.In part, this may be because much of the population in countries such as Poland and Hungary retained a Catholic identity during the communist era, leaving less of a religious vacuum to be filled when the USSR fell.To the extent that there has been measurable religious change in recent decades in Central and Eastern European countries with large Catholic populations, it has been in the direction of greater secularization.Learn simple and quick ways how to shield yourself from scams and fraud in dating Eastern European women. If you want to know the dirty tricks of scammers and swindlers, you need to read this — and stop pouring your hard earned cash down the toilet.There is an organized crime machine designed to make you open your wallet and give them your dollars, euro, and pounds.Are you dating Russian, Ukrainian women from the countries of the former USSR? This information can save you thousands of dollars and months of wasted time and effort.

But these perceptions do not tell the entire story.

In addition, Catholics in Central and Eastern Europe are much more likely than Orthodox Christians to say they engage in religious practices such as taking communion and fasting during Lent.

Catholics also are somewhat more likely than Orthodox Christians to say they frequently share their views on God with others, and to say they read or listen to scripture outside of religious services.

The most dramatic shift in this regard has occurred in the Czech Republic, where the share of the public identifying as Catholic dropped from 44% in 1991 to 21% in the current survey.

Today, the Czech Republic is one of the most secular countries in Europe, with nearly three-quarters of adults (72%) describing their religion as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular.” The differing trends in predominantly Orthodox and Catholic countries may be, at least in part, a reflection of political geography.

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